Joyce Hinnefeld

“Provocative and page-turning . . . Hinnefeld’s drama soars . . .” (Publisher's Weekly, September 2008)

Excerpts

From Chapter 1
According to John James Audubon, there was once a species of bird in southeastern Pennsylvania, the Cuvier’s kinglet, Regulus cuvieri, or, as Audubon liked to call it, Cuvier’s wren. And according to Addie and Tom Kavanagh, the mysterious bird may have magically appeared again nearly two hundred years later on a ridge near their home, seventyfive miles north of Audubon’s original sighting. Continued ...

 

From Chapter 6
She would have nothing to do with traditional treatment this time, she said. No chemotherapy, nothing. Despite the time it might buy her. No more battling the cells exploding everywhere inside her, growing fast and furious—her own internal suburban sprawl. Continued ...

 

From Chapter 12
She’d noticed immediately: he ’d had a shower. Instantly she’d known why. And she ’d known that she ’d driven him to it. Reading too much, thinking too much, trying to say to someone, anyone: Please notice this! Already our groundwater is tainted, laced now not only with arsenic but with countless other toxins, all leaching down from another Schafer construction site. And when those houses are occupied, it will be far worse. Every time it rains, pesticides from those two- and three-acre, weed-free lawns will seep down to Nisky Creek, to the river, and make their way into Delaware Bay. Then everyone will wonder why so many people have cancer, and why the doctors can’t just do something about it. Because God forbid we have to look at anything we might be doing to ourselves. Continued ...

 

From Chapter 17
Scarlet’s relationship with Alex might have continued, in that onagain, off-again way, if the new millennium hadn’t brought some surprises, some of them more personal than others, for both her and her parents. What triggered Addie’s restlessness again? A stolen presidential election? The threat of greater environmental losses than she and Tom would have even dreamed of, idealistically penning and illustrating A Prosody of Birds thirty years before? And eventually the unforeseen, and completely unimaginable, attack on the World Trade Center? Continued ...